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these_instructions [2018/04/15 23:48]
gavin
these_instructions [2018/05/22 19:18] (current)
marty
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 3D printing is a great way to turn your creative ideas into tangible objects. ​ Whether it is to make a quick prototype of a novel clothes peg, some funky new earrings or to replace a broken part of your favourite fishing rod, 3D printing provides you with the technology to easily do this. 3D printing is a great way to turn your creative ideas into tangible objects. ​ Whether it is to make a quick prototype of a novel clothes peg, some funky new earrings or to replace a broken part of your favourite fishing rod, 3D printing provides you with the technology to easily do this.
  
-To print something out in 3D, you will need to take a couple of steps before you can hit the print button. First you will need to create a 3D model and save it as an STL file – a file that contains all the information about the object’s shape. Then you will need to use some software to turn that model into a format that the 3D printer can read.  This format is called GCODE and you use a slicing software package to produce. This file can then be printed out.  Sometimes the objects comes out of the printer looking a little bit rough on the surface and you can for instance ​sand the surface to give it have a smoother finish. Each of these steps will be discussed in more detail below.+To print something out in 3D, you will need to take a couple of steps before you can hit the print button. First you will need to create a 3D model and save it as an STL file – a file that contains all the information about the object’s shape. Then you will need to use some software to turn that model into a format that the 3D printer can read.  This format is called GCODE and you use a slicing software package to produce. This file can then be printed out.  Sometimes the objects comes out of the printer looking a little bit rough on the surface and you can sand the surface to give it have a smoother finish. Each of these steps will be discussed in more detail below.
  
 ==== Create a 3D model ==== ==== Create a 3D model ====
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 If you want to print a copy of an existing object, and have access to a 3D scanner you can create a digital model of that object. ​ If you want to print a copy of an existing object, and have access to a 3D scanner you can create a digital model of that object. ​
  
-With your 3D model savedas an STL file, you are now ready for the next step.+With your 3D model saved as an STL file, you are now ready for the next step.
  
 ==== Prepare model for printing ==== ==== Prepare model for printing ====
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-Printers like the UP mini2 that we have at the Noosa Library Service ​Makerspace use their own dedicated slicing software ([[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=Ksem3NVTWiA|youtube tutorial]]). Other printers rely on third party software packages like  [[https://​www.slicer.org|Slic3r]] or [[https://​www.ultimaker.com/​en/​products/​ultimaker-cura-software|Cura]] to create the GCODE.+Printers like the UP mini2 that we have in our Makerspace use their own dedicated slicing software ([[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=Ksem3NVTWiA|youtube tutorial]]). Other printers rely on third party software packages like  [[https://​www.slicer.org|Slic3r]] or [[https://​www.ultimaker.com/​en/​products/​ultimaker-cura-software|Cura]] to create the GCODE.
  
 Some printers can print directly from your computer, whereas with other models you will have to transfer the GCODE to the printer using an SD card. Some printers can print directly from your computer, whereas with other models you will have to transfer the GCODE to the printer using an SD card.
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 ==== Print the 3D model ==== ==== Print the 3D model ====
 With the GCODE ready it is now finally time to see your design come to life. With the GCODE ready it is now finally time to see your design come to life.
-The 3D printers available ​at the Noosa Library Service ​Makerspace are FDM ([[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=GxLjDNrQBgs|Fused Deposition Modelling]]) printers. These printers heat up a plastic filament and build up the 3D objects layer by layer.+The 3D printers available ​in our Makerspace are FDM ([[https://​www.youtube.com/​watch?​v=GxLjDNrQBgs|Fused Deposition Modelling]]) printers. These printers heat up a plastic filament and build up the 3D objects layer by layer.
  
-At the Noosa Library Service ​Makerspace we have the following printers available for use. If you are going to use one of these, familiarise yourself with the specifics of that machine by reading the manual.+In the Makerspace we have the following printers available for use. If you are going to use one of these, familiarise yourself with the specifics of that machine by reading the manual.
   * {{ :​up_mini2_manual_v0.1.pdf |UP mini2}}   * {{ :​up_mini2_manual_v0.1.pdf |UP mini2}}
   * {{ :​prusa3d_manual_mk2_en.pdf |Prusa i3 Mk2}}   * {{ :​prusa3d_manual_mk2_en.pdf |Prusa i3 Mk2}}